Linux Mint 21.1 “Vera” MATE released!

The team is proud to announce the release of Linux Mint 21.1 “Vera” MATE Edition.

Linux Mint 21.1 Vera MATE Edition

Linux Mint 21.1 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2027. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

New features:

This new version of Linux Mint contains many improvements.

For an overview of the new features please visit:

What’s new in Linux Mint 21.1 MATE“.

Important info:

The release notes provide important information about known issues, as well as explanations, workarounds and solutions.

To read the release notes, please visit:

Release Notes for Linux Mint 21.1 MATE

System requirements:

  • 2GB RAM (4GB recommended for a comfortable usage).
  • 20GB of disk space (100GB recommended).
  • 1024×768 resolution (on lower resolutions, press ALT to drag windows with the mouse if they don’t fit in the screen).

Upgrade instructions:

  • If you are running the BETA you don’t need to upgrade, use the Update Manager to apply available updates.
  • Upgrade instructions for Linux Mint 21 will be provided shortly.

Download links:

Here are the download links:

Integrity and authenticity checks:

Once you have downloaded an image, please verify its integrity and authenticity.

Anyone can produce fake ISO images, it is your responsibility to check you are downloading the official ones.

Enjoy!

We look forward to receiving your feedback. Thank you for using Linux Mint and have a lot of fun with this new release!

18 comments

  1. I know this thread is about the new release of Linux Mint 21, but I have a Python question about LM 21 and that is can I install Python 2.7.18 alongside my Python 3.10.6 or would that break my system? I have some older programs-apps that will only run with Python 2.7 and I’m no coder.
    P.S. Merry Christmas and Happy New Years, Clem and Linux Mint Team 🙂

  2. Not gonna lie, I hate “fresh new modern look and feel” updates. I pick Mint and MATE in particular BECAUSE it (so far) hasn’t tried to imitate other distros that constantly change the default look. Often these changes are for the worse (flat buttons…ambiguous left/right sliders). In any case it’s pointless since users can just change things back, but it’s just rearranging deckchairs on a ship. At least it hasn’t hit an iceberg so far.

    1. perhaps handy: THEME TIPS

      The 21.1 hairdressing is mostly-reverted by going to a MINT-Y theme if you liked mint 20, MINT-X if you prefer 18.

      Control Center > Appearance > Theme > Mint-X
      Control Center > Appearance > Theme > Customize…
      for panels Controls, Window Border, & Icons, select Mint-X
      for panel Pointer select DMZ (White)

      for the LOGON THEME
      Control Center > Login Window
      change GTK Theme & Icon Theme to Mint-X, change Pointer Theme to DMZ (White)

      You /might/ want to reduce Mate panel height. I use 22 pixels on my Mint-X themed main desktop. But I think we used to be 24 pixels for a while, perhaps. It’s 27 lately.

      FWIW, I’ve left the rest of my boxes at default for 20.x. That theme is okay, but it hasn’t grown on me with use. Mint-X has been Mint’s high-point in good design.

      21.1 theme… just oh-my-gosh no. And I do both use & visit a number of other distros. I’m with the fellow that said this looks like a change that a teenager does. But happily it does adjust easily, and the rest of the try-out has been going very well. Great job on that, Mint-folk. Thank you!

  3. “Iso verification tool” still absent for me on Mate stable (fresh installation). No “Verify” option in the contextual menu, either I put the iso on the destop or in Downloads folder.
    Thanks.

    1. Have you tried using Nemo as a file manager instead of Caja? Nemo has the verify function. Appears to have been left out of Caja. I just check on that again a few minutes ago.

    2. I might add here that Nemo is the default file manager for Cinnamon, which apparently gets most of the attention from the developers, and Caja is the default manager for Mate. Nemo is, of course, easy to add to Mate and is what I prefer most of the time.

    3. Jerry,
      I don’t like cinnamon!

      “That what they say about mate edition : Stable, robust, traditional
      Although it misses a few features and its development is slower than Cinnamon’s, MATE runs faster, uses fewer resources and is more stable than Cinnamon.”

      I won’t install somthething from Cinnamon.

      They also say that “Iso verification tool” is in the new mate features list, so it should be there without installing nemo. Thanks.

  4. Loaded 21.1 Mate onto a Dell Optiplex 780
    Works like a dream, this message sent from that PC
    This is by far the best Linux distro

  5. I have a question.

    How can I access a LinuxMint partition on a second Drive while Linux Mint OS is runninG? I heard about /dev/vgmint/ is the problem (2 times same)… How to fix? It s really annoying not being able to transfer data from old to newer installation with both having Mint installed….

  6. 2nd question: Why does Linux Mint screw up manjaro’ s GRUB ? Reminds me of WIndows and Linux where both overwrite the other and the user is the stupid one ….

  7. Bonjour,
    I bought a LENOVO product: 82SB v: IdeaPad Gaming 3 15ARH7 6 months ago, installed mint mate 21, wifi and bluetooth were not working, I found the wifi driver (rtl8852be) and now iwifi works. I recently installed mint 21.1 and neither wfi nor bluetooth work, so I installed the wifi driver and it works however I could not find any solution for bluetooth.
    FYI, i tested with ubuntu 22.04 and it’s the same, I then tested with ubuntu 22.10 and bluetooh works , so the question is :
    Knowing that the solution to fix the bluetooth issue exists, when will it be available on mint ??
    Merci et bonne année
    Patrick

    1. By now you probably already found a solution, but in the past I also had such problems with new hardware, such as not working WiFi or a stuttering and crashing system etc. The default kernel included in Linux Mint is very stable and very suitable for somewhat older systems, but often does not work optimally on the latest hardware. Manually installing a newer kernel (which has also recently become available again in the Linux Mint update manager) was the solution for me. You may have already thought of this, but just wanted to share my experience.

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